What is Shakespeare saying in To be or not to be?

What is Shakespeare saying in To be or not to be?

This quote from the play Hamlet, “To be, or not to be? That is the question—Whether 'tis nobler in the mind to suffer The slings and arrows of outrageous fortune, Or to take arms against a sea of troubles, And, by opposing, end them?” The idea of whether is it better to live or to die.

What is the meaning of To be or not to be that is the question?

The soliloquy is essentially all about life and death: "To be or not to be" means "To live or not to live" (or "To live or to die"). Hamlet discusses how painful and miserable human life is, and how death (specifically suicide) would be preferable, would it not be for the fearful uncertainty of what comes after death.

Where is the quote To be or not to be that is the question from?

Hamlet, Act III, Scene I [To be, or not to be] by William Shakespeare - Poems | poets.org.

Who quoted To be or not to be that is the question?

William Shakespeare's While William Shakespeare's reputation is based primarily on his plays, he became famous first as a poet.

Who is Hamlet talking to in To be, or not to be?

Polonius hears Hamlet coming, and he and the king hide. Hamlet enters, speaking thoughtfully and agonizingly to himself about the question of whether to commit suicide to end the pain of experience: “To be, or not to be: that is the question” (III.

What is Hamlet's tragic flaw?

The word 'tragic flaw' is taken from the Greek concept of Hamartia used by Greek philosopher Aristotle in his Poetics. Shakespeare's tragic hero Hamlet's fatal flaw is his failure to act immediately to kill Claudius, his uncle and murderer of his father. His tragic flaw is 'procrastination'.

Do be or not to be?

"To be, or not to be" is the opening phrase of a soliloquy given by Prince Hamlet in the so-called "nunnery scene" of William Shakespeare's play Hamlet, Act 3, Scene 1. In the speech, Hamlet contemplates death and suicide, bemoaning the pain and unfairness of life but acknowledging that the alternative might be worse.

Is to be or not to be a question?

The famous line that begins Prince Hamlet's soliloquy in Shakespeare's Hamlet, "To be, or not to be, that is the question" is probably the most cited statement in all classical drama. ... "To be or not to be" is in fact, not the question. It is the wrong question. Claiming that a question is wrong may sound odd.

What is the answer To be, or not to be?

The answer to the question, “To be, or not to be”, is, “Yes”. Er, right … so that's that then. Alternatively, there's a particular term for a logical expression that always comes out true, whatever the inputs are. It's called a tautology (a slightly refined usage of the general English meaning).

What's the rest of To be, or not to be?

"To be, or not to be" is the opening phrase of a soliloquy given by Prince Hamlet in the so-called "nunnery scene" of William Shakespeare's play Hamlet, Act 3, Scene 1. In the speech, Hamlet contemplates death and suicide, bemoaning the pain and unfairness of life but acknowledging that the alternative might be worse.

Did you assay him to any pastime?

QUEEN Did you assay him to any pastime? This night to play before him. To hear him so inclined. And drive his purpose into these delights.

Why is Hamlet a procrastinator?

In this soliloquy, Hamlet contemplates suicide because he doesn't comprehend why people choose to bear miseries when life could be simply ended; however, he also fears the uncertainty of the after life. Therefore, Hamlet's intellect and contemplation is what leads him to procrastinate.

Who kills Hamlet?

Laertes During the match, Claudius conspires with Laertes to kill Hamlet.

Why is the To be, or not to be soliloquy so famous?

Why is Hamlet's 'To be or not to be' speech so famous? This is partly because the opening words are so interesting, memorable and intriguing, but also because Shakespeare ranges around several cultures and practices to borrow the language for his images.

How do you quote To be, or not to be?

“To be, or not to be: that is the question: Whether 'tis nobler in the mind to suffer.

Is to be or not to be a metaphor?

The famous "To be or not to be" soliloquy is full of metaphors as well. The whole first section of the speech is using the stock metaphor of death as sleep. ... At the end of the soliloquy Hamlet talks about "the undiscovered country." He is talking about death and the afterlife.

Who is Hamlet talking to in To Be or Not To Be?

Polonius hears Hamlet coming, and he and the king hide. Hamlet enters, speaking thoughtfully and agonizingly to himself about the question of whether to commit suicide to end the pain of experience: “To be, or not to be: that is the question” (III.

What does Claudius mean when he says my words fly up my thoughts remain below words without thoughts never to heaven go?

Words without thoughts never to heaven go” In other words, he is not willing to repent of his sin, therefore, the sin will not be forgiven. So Claudius' words are flying up but because he does not have the repentance to go with the words, his words will never reach heaven.

What was Hamlet's tragic flaw?

The word 'tragic flaw' is taken from the Greek concept of Hamartia used by Greek philosopher Aristotle in his Poetics. Shakespeare's tragic hero Hamlet's fatal flaw is his failure to act immediately to kill Claudius, his uncle and murderer of his father. His tragic flaw is 'procrastination'.

How does hamlets procrastination lead to his death?

Hamlet is attracted to his mother Gertrude but the presence of Claudius condenses the possibility of intimacy with his mother. ... The fear of such an occurrence leads Hamlet to procrastinate the death of Claudius through self deception.